The Resurrection of Our Lord—Easter Dawn

Our Baptism Connects Us to Jesus’ Resurrection


It was killing me. I can’t speak for all of you, but I spend much of my day just trying to stay awake. So years ago, I started drinking tea. Then I found that you could buy bags of loose-leaf tea. And so, every morning, I’d fill up the tea ball with earl grey tea. And then just keep pouring water in that cup throughout the day. And I’d go into the doctor and the doctor would tell me that my liver and kidney numbers were off. I did my research and found out that a little tea was fine. But the oil of Bergamot in earl grey in higher doses was toxic. It was slowly killing me. So when I found that out, what did I do? I kept drinking tea? No, I stopped. If there is something out there that murders you, would you love it? Would you live for it? That’s where Paul starts off this Easter morning. We read: 1 What should we say then? Should we continue in sin so that grace may multiply? 2 Absolutely not! How can we who died to sin still live in it?” (Romans 6:1–2 CSB17)


Sin is toxic. Sin is poisonous. Sin put us to death when Adam and Eve first sinned and now that sin is passed down to us. Sin did all this evil. We died because of sin. Why would we love it? Why would we live for it? Well if sin is so toxic and so poisonous, what is the solution to it? Paul tells us: “Or are you unaware that all of us who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death?” (Romans 6:3 CSB17)


One of my professors used to say that one of the proofs that the bible is true and inspired by God is that, if we were writing the bible, it would never turn out the way it is written in the bible. And here’s a good example. If sin the toxic, poisonous problem, then what is the solution? Baptism is the solution. And what I love is how Paul explains this. He tells them that this is something they should know already.1 And what should we already know? Baptism connects us to Christ’s death.


Now, as we read these words, there are two vital truths that we need to understand as we read them. First, this is not picture language. Jesus really, truly died. And our baptisms really truly unite us with his death. And second, baptism is not our work. It is God’s. In every passage in the bible speaking about baptism, this sacrament is not our gift of obedience that we offer up to God. Instead it is God’s gift to us and work in us. Baptism connects us to Christ’s death. And because of that it does much more. We read: “Therefore we were buried with him by baptism into death, in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too may walk in newness of life.” (Romans 6:4 CSB17)


Notice the clear progression of thought: Jesus died → Jesus rose. If in baptism God connects us to Jesus’ death, → he also connects us to Jesus’ new life. And, my dear friends in Christ, both of those thoughts are vitally important. God delivers resurrection forgiveness through our baptisms. Sin is put to death with Jesus’ death on Good Friday. But what good is that payment if that forgiveness doesn’t come to us? We need a delivery system to get that forgiveness from the cross to us. And our desires and decisions will not get the job done. What is the tool that God uses to deliver that forgiveness to us? His word. And here in baptism, that word is connected with water and tied to Jesus’ death so that the forgiveness that Jesus wins will be ours. But there’s more happening here in baptism. Paul tells us: 5 For if we have been united with him in the likeness of his death, we will certainly also be in the likeness of his resurrection. 6 For we know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body ruled by sin might be rendered powerless so that we may no longer be enslaved to sin, 7 since a person who has died is freed from sin.” (Romans 6:5–7 CSB17)


If in baptism we share in Jesus death (and we do!), then also in baptism we share in Jesus resurrection strength. So, up to this point, we have been building some beautiful theology. But, as our professors used to tell us, theology is practical. We need to ask the question, ‘why should I care that baptism connects me to Jesus’ death and new life?’ And here’s your answer: In baptism sin’s addiction is forgiven. I can give up tea because I’m not really that connected to and addicted to it. But can I say the same about sin? Years ago I knew a man who smoked. And he had smoked often over the course of decades. He went to the hospital because of the damage he had done to himself. The doctor said that if he didn’t quit he’d be driving himself to an early death. So he tried again and again to quit, but was unable. “ Can I be forgiven?” That was the question he asked. For it was one thing to fall into sin. It’s another thing entirely to be addicted to it. And all of us have these addictions because that what sin does. It connects us and addicts us to what is evil. Some are drawn to bad pictures and videos on the internet. Others are drawn to gossipping in the internet. Some eat and drink too much. Others eat and drink too little. So very many addictions—and what will rescue us from them? Notice how clear Paul is. Your baptism connects you to Jesus’ death. In that empty tomb your addictions are put to death. On that bloody cross your addictions are crushed along with Jesus’ body.


Oh, but there’s more to it than that. In baptism sin’s addiction is forgiven. But also in baptism Christ’s strength is given. As we pile up so many sins over our lives we want and yearn to be done with them. But they defy us and defile us. And we can easily end up in a place where we simply give up and say to ourselves, “why bother?” That’s where these words are so full meaning and hope. In baptism Christ’s strength is given. In baptism we are connected to all the strength, might and power Jesus showed in his resurrection. And he connects us to his strength so that we would no longer be enslaved to our addictive sins, but instead, willingly, gladly and freely follow Jesus.


So my dear friends in Christ, year after year, when you return to this day don’t just think of the fact that Jesus rose from the dead on this day. Also ponder the fact that in your baptisms God connects you to this day. For in baptism sin’s addiction is forgiven. And in baptism Christ’s strength is given. Amen.



1 “Ⲏⲁⲅⲛⲟⲉⲓⲧⲉ” (Romans 6:3 GNT-ALEX)

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